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TEACH JAPAN

Resources for students and educators

Beliefs

About Japan: A Teacher’s Resource

About Japan: A Teacher’s Resource provides a variety of resources about Japan to educators for use in the K-12 classroom. Resources are organized around the themes of culture, environment, globalization, history, Japanese language, and social issues and consist of lesson plans, articles by leading scholars and primary source images and video. Through these classroom ready resources, educators are able to expand and deepen their teaching on Japan.

Provided by Japan Society

Teacher Resources from the Denver Art Museum

Explore the Denver Art Museum’s comprehensive collection of lesson plans and resources for educators. Lessons range from 30 to 50 minutes, and are based on objects from the Denver Museum’s Japanese collection. Resources available for all ages and learning levels.

Provided by Denver Art Museum

Got Head for Compassion?

This lesson focuses on the story of the Eleven-Headed Bodhisattva of Compassion and the definition of “compassion.” Students will work with visual images and tools to enhance oral and listening skills, while building upon kindness in peer relationships and with others around them

Objectives
Students will be able to:

use listening and oral skills;
make connections to the world around them; and
work with classmates to complete a visual diagram about the Bodhisattva.

Provided by Denver Art Museum

Detecting Tiny Details

Close observation helps students see tiny details in the Grip Enhancers (Menuki) with Rats. They will use these details to engage in different visual arts and movement activities. A video about mochi (one of the objects on the grip enhancers) and activities in Japan around making mochi rounds out the lesson.

Objectives
Students will be able to:

List at least three details they see on each Grip Enhancers (Menuki) with Rats;
Make shapes out of clay based on shapes they see in the grip enhancers;
Describe how the Japanese villagers come together to make mochi and why it’s special for their New Year.

Provided by Denver Art Museum

A Map of Compassion

Students will critically examine and discuss the image of the Eleven-Headed Bodhisattva of Compassion. They will then discuss and view examples of mind maps. In small groups students will create an original mind map to organize their thoughts and ideas around the concept of compassion.

Objectives
Students will be able to:

describe and analyze what they see in the Eleven-Headed Bodhisattva of Compassion;
discuss symbolic and actual demonstrations of compassion; and
collaborate in groups to design and create a mind map as a graphical representation of compassion.

Provided by Denver Art Museum

Luminous: The Arts of Asia Educator Resource Guide

The projects in this guide connect to a wide range of core curriculum subject areas and can be adapted for a
variety of grade levels to meet Washington State Standards and Common Core Standards of Learning. The projects and discussions outlined in this guide may be conducted independent of a trip to the exhibition Luminous: The Art of Asia. Each section of this guide includes works of art from SAM’s permanent collection featured in the Luminous: The Art of Asia. Additional information can be found on SAM’s website (seattleartmuseum.org/luminous) as well as in the resource section of this guide.

OBJECTIVES
1. Introduce students to the art and history of Asia across time and place.
2. Prompt discussions that allow students to share their own insights and perspectives.
3. Encourage creative exploration and discovery.
4. Deepen students’ understanding of how culture and art are shaped by context and that the meaning
and interpretation of these objects can shift over time.
5. Build thematic connections between works of art and classroom curricula.

Provided by Seattle Art Museum

The Art of Sōtatsu

Discover Tawaraya Sōtatsu, one of the most influential figures in the history of Japanese visual culture, with images collected by the Freer|Sackler Education Department from the museums’ permanent collection.

Provided by Freer Sackler

Explore the Freer Sackler Collection

Search, download, and create resources for your classroom using the Freer Sackler digital collection. With more than forty thousand works available for high-resolution download—expanding regularly with new acquisitions—you can explore the Smithsonian’s museums of Asian art from anywhere in the world, whenever you like.

Provided by Freer Sackler

The World of the Japanese Illustrated Book

Search the Pulverer Collection, one of the most outstanding and comprehensive collections of Japanese illustrated books outside Japan.

Provided by Freer Sackler

The Four Religions of East Asia

This lesson provides an introduction to China and Japan’s four mjor religions: Buddhism, Confucianism, Daoism, and Shinto.

Provided by Cleveland Museum of Art
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Find out more about TeachJapan.
Lead funding for the Asian Art Museum’s TeachJapan is generously provided by The Japan Foundation Center for Global Partnership.
Additional support is provided by Susan and Kevin McCabe.

Teach Japan was created in collaboration with the following arts organizations: