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TEACH JAPAN

Resources for students and educators

Artistic Techniques

The Art of Sōtatsu

Discover Tawaraya Sōtatsu, one of the most influential figures in the history of Japanese visual culture, with images collected by the Freer|Sackler Education Department from the museums’ permanent collection.

Provided by Freer Sackler

Explore the Freer Sackler Collection

Search, download, and create resources for your classroom using the Freer Sackler digital collection. With more than forty thousand works available for high-resolution download—expanding regularly with new acquisitions—you can explore the Smithsonian’s museums of Asian art from anywhere in the world, whenever you like.

Provided by Freer Sackler

Waves at Matsushima Educator Resource

Waves at Matsushima was painted by Tawaraya Sōtatsu, a revered Japanese painter.  Sōtatsu’s experimental painting techniques and brilliantly conceived compositions transformed Japan’s courtly artistic style.

Provided by Freer Sackler

The World of the Japanese Illustrated Book

Search the Pulverer Collection, one of the most outstanding and comprehensive collections of Japanese illustrated books outside Japan.

Provided by Freer Sackler

Heroes and Legends: Samurai in Japanese Prints

Discover how artists depicted samurai to explore legends and communicate social and political messages through musha-e, prints depicting warriors.

 

 

Provided by Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

Art of Japan: Temples, Towns and Traditions

Explore artworks from the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston’s collection of Japanese art.

Provided by Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

The Way of Tea

Discover the rich history of the Japanese tea gathering.

Provided by Asian Art Museum

The Spiritual Life of the Samurai: Meditation and Brushpainting

Students will discuss the ways in which spiritual belief supported and enhanced the military func­tion and cultural values of the samurai. They will experience this practice through an ink painting activity.

Provided by Asian Art Museum

Kyogen Theater: The Art of Laughter

Performed on a simple stage, Kyogen (literally “wild speech”) first developed in the 1300s. Kyogen actors performed during interludes between Noh performances, providing comic relief.

Provided by Asian Art Museum
(2:59)
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Japanese Baskets

World-reknown collector, Lloyd Cotsen, explains artistic innovations in Japanese basketry.

Provided by Asian Art Museum
(7:31)
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Find out more about TeachJapan.
Lead funding for the Asian Art Museum’s TeachJapan is generously provided by The Japan Foundation Center for Global Partnership.
Additional support is provided by Susan and Kevin McCabe.

Teach Japan was created in collaboration with the following arts organizations: